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Jeff Cremer


Recent Posts

Epic Camera Trap Photos From The Peruvian Amazon + Termites Attack!

[fa icon="calendar'] Sep 14, 2015 10:00:00 AM / by Jeff Cremer posted in photography, wildlife photography, Amazon, Peru, rainforest, camera trap

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TAMBOPATA, PERU 

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Photographing A Harpy Eagle + Canon 800mm f/5.6 lens review and Live View Focusing Technique

[fa icon="calendar'] Jun 18, 2015 12:06:00 AM / by Jeff Cremer posted in wildlife photography

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Harpy Eagles are the AH-64 Apache gunship helicopters of the jungle:
  • Stalking the Shadows - Harpy eagles fly below the canopy in the dense shadowy forest hunting for sloths and monkeys.
  • High Speed Flight - A harpy eagle can reach speeds of over 50mph while attacking prey in a dive.
  • Vertical Flight Capabilities - They have short, broad wings and can fly almost straight up, too, so it can attack prey from below as well as above.
  • Advanced Target Acquisition - A Harpy eagle can turn its head upside down to get a better look at its potential meal. They also have excellent vision and can see something less than 1 inch (2 centimeters) in size from almost 220 yards (200 meters) away.
  • Serious Weapons – Harpy Eagles have huge talons. Their rear talons can reach over 5 inches long – the same size as a grizzly bear’s claws!
  • How rare are harpy eagles? I don't really know but they are pretty damn rare and seeing a chick in the wild is almost impossible.

 

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35 Awesome Photos of Rainforest Animals and Wildlife

[fa icon="calendar'] Sep 14, 2014 10:00:00 PM / by Jeff Cremer posted in photos, wildlife, wildlife photography, Amazon, Peru, rainforest, animals, Tambopata

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Lucas Bustamante recently visited our lodges in Tambopata, Peru for a few weeks and took these incredible photos of Amazon rainforest wildlife.   

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How studying Macaws can save the Amazon

[fa icon="calendar'] Mar 11, 2014 12:00:00 AM / by Jeff Cremer posted in macaws

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How studying Macaws can save the Amazon

It’s one of the most stunning sights in the Peruvian rainforest. Every morning, just after sunrise, a riot of rainbows swoops down on the world’s largest avian clay lick in the southern jungle of Peru.

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Wired Amazon in Tambopata Peru

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