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The Brazilian Wandering Spider is also a natural Viagra

Kurt Holle

The Brazilian Wandering Spider (Phoneutria fera and P. nigriventer) is on any list of the top 5 venomous spiders in the world. In Brazil they know this well. Emergency wards are used to seeing patients bitten by the spider. A telltale sign that a male has been bitten by the Brazilian Wandering Spider is an erection. That is the first question a doctor asks a patient.

 

Brazilian Wandering Spider

 

So Kenia Pedrosa Nunes and Romulo Leite of the Medical College of Georgia did a little experiment. They separated the different components of the venom and injected them into mice. They discovered a short string of amino acids (a peptide) called Tx2-6 was the cause for the erections. They found this peptide increases nitric oxide – a compound released by mammals when sexually aroused. The function of this compound is to tell the brain to get started making an erection. Nitric oxide is the first domino that falls in the biochemical cascade that ends in an erection.

The way Tx2-6 works is completely different to Viagra. Viagra inhibits the enzyme that breaks up erections – the brake. So a combination of Tx2-6 and Viagra would work wonders. It would hopefully help males that don’t respond well to Viagra.

As usual heres the link to the paper

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